What Grain Broadhead For Longbow? (Archer’s Choice)

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A right-grain broadhead plays a crucial role in hunting and helps to ensure an ethical kill of the animal.

The grain of a broadhead for your longbow may vary depending on your bow’s draw weight, a target game, and specific bow setup. In general, a standard broadhead weight ranges from 100 to 150 grains. So, what grain broadhead for longbow?

What Grain Broadhead For Longbow.

In general,

most hunters use a 100-grain broadhead for its available options. If your draw weight is under 55 lbs, a 100-grain head is recommended for better arrow speed and penetration. For a higher draw weight, a 125-grain broadhead is suitable and offers better penetration.

This is a simple answer for you. Let’s dive right in to clarify the right grain of a broadhead for a successful hunt.

What Is The Broadhead Weight Range?

The weight of a broadhead is a critical consideration when selecting the best one for your hunting needs.  This also matters on knock off rage broadheads.

What Is The Broadhead Weight Range

In general,

A standard broadhead weight ranges from 100 to 150 grains. Most bowhunters use 100-grain broadheads because they provide the best balance for all common scenarios, including deer and most other standard game.

It’s important to note that the weight of a broadhead affects arrow power, penetration, and FOC (front of center). You will be able to gain kinetic energy but lose speed when using a heavier broadhead. They are also more quiet, which makes them ideal for hunting.

So, how do I know what grain broadhead to use?

The grain of broadhead to use is determined by factors such as game size, bow poundage, arrow weights, and shooting distance. 

A general rule of thumb is to use 100 grains for lightweight shafts and smaller games and 125 grains for heavier shafts and larger games.

You can think about adding 25 grains to your broadhead for better penetration.

You can use screw-in weights that fasten to the rear of the insert to add 25 grains to a broadhead. Washers that fit between the arrow’s head and end can also be used. 

What Grain Broadhead For Longbow?

The choice of broadhead grain for a longbow depends on several factors, such as the draw weight of the bow and the game you’re hunting. So, what grain broadhead should I use?

If your draw weight is less than 55 pounds, use a lower-grain broadhead (100gr). This will increase your arrow speeds, resulting in greater penetration. 

What Grain Broadhead For Longbow

For those with heavier draw weight, 125-grain broadheads provide better penetration. But if the arrow doesn’t get from your start point to your endpoint, you may end up doing more harm than good.

If you want to go for large game hunting like elk or moose, you should use 125-grain broadhead.

  • With 70-pound bows, use 16 grains of lighter arrow weight per pound of draw weight,
  • with 60-pound bows, use 18 grains of arrow weight per pound of draw weight; and 
  • with 50-pound bows, use 20 grains of light arrow weight per pound of draw weight.

So, how much does a 100 grain broadhead weigh?

A 100-grain broadhead is equivalent to approximately 6.5 grams. This weight can affect the arrow’s speed, kinetic energy, and penetration.

Because of their slightly increased range and velocity, 100-grain broadheads are the most popular. Trad bows are also the same as the longbow.

Heavier arrows with 125-grain broadheads are becoming increasingly popular, particularly among those who hunt large game, because they can more reliably penetrate thick hide and push past bone.

Based on the recommendations above, 

It is best to use a lower (100gr) grain broadhead for better arrow speed and penetration if your draw weight is less than 55 pounds.

Remember, it’s essential to always have the exact grain on your field points as you do on your broadheads. So, choose one of them based on your specific needs and hunting style.

What Factors Influence The Grain Of Broadhead?

A broadhead’s weight is usually expressed in grains. The performance of a broadhead is significantly influenced by its grain weight, which is determined by several factors. Here are some crucial things to remember:

Type of Broadhead

Broadheads with Fixed Blades: These broadheads feature blades that are permanently affixed to the ferrule. 

The broadhead’s total weight can be affected by the quantity and configuration of its blades. So, consider your minimum arrow weight, including broadhead, for optimal performance.

Broadheads with mechanical (expandable) blades: These broadheads split open when they strike something. 

The overall grain weight can be influenced by the number and design of the blades, as the weight is frequently concentrated in the ferrule.

Material Of The Blade

The broadhead’s weight can be affected by the type of material used for the blades. Stainless steel, carbon steel, or even mechanical parts in the case of expandable broadheads are common materials for blades.

The Number Of Blades

The weight of a broadhead is determined by how many blades it has. Grain arrow weights may be higher in broadheads with more blades or larger cutting surfaces.

Material For Ferrules

The ferrule, which is the broadhead’s main body, can weigh differently depending on the material used to construct it. Titanium, stainless steel, and aluminum are examples of everyday materials.

Draw Weight Of Bow

Some broadhead weights may not be suitable for your bow, depending on its draw weight. Using heavier heads might be possible with higher draw weights.

Spine Of Arrow

The appropriate broadhead weight is dependent on the arrow’s spine. Heavier broadheads are a better fit with a stiffer arrow spine. Also, check to see if broadheads are sharp enough to hunt.

Now the question is:

How do you know what grain broadhead to shoot?

Take into account the following elements when choosing a grain broadhead:

  • The size of your hunting game
  • The Situation in the Environment
  • Model of a broadhead

When hunting big game, your arrow should weigh between 8.5 and 10.5 grains per inch and have a minimum spined arrows count of 400. The 125 and 100 grain broadhead sizes are the most popular ones. 

During practice sessions, experiment with both 100 and 125 grain heads to see which is most effective for your particular crossbow setup.

How Do I Tune My Longbow For Different Broadhead Weights?

You can tune your longbow for different broadhead weights by doing the following:

How Do I Tune My Longbow For Different Broadhead Weights
  • Make sure your nock, fletching, and broadheads are in line.
  • From a distance of 20 yards, aim your broadhead arrow at a bullseye.
  • Then, from 20 yards, aim your field point arrow at the same bullseye. Repeat the procedure and evaluate the results.
  • Adjust your bow until you reach the same point of impact (POI). If the broadhead strikes to the left of the fieldpoint, move your rest to the left until it shares the fieldpoint’s POI.
  • Tune your bow with a field point (FP) tipped arrow, shooting an identical bare shaft.  When bare shafts group with your fletched arrows and have a good flight, your broadheads will shoot to the point of aim.
  • Spin each arrow with a broadhead with an arrow spinner. The goal is for the arrows to spin tightly with no wobble. If they wobble, switch to another arrow and spin it again. If you still can’t get that arrow to spin true, throw it away.

However, by following all these steps, you can tune your longbow for different broadhead weights.

How To Choose The Right Arrow For My Longbow?

To choose the right arrow for your longer bow, here are some guidelines:

How To Choose The Right Arrow For My Longbow

Choose Your Material: Nonstiff wood, aluminum arrows, or carbon arrows are your options. The most favored material for longbow shooters is wood.

For longbow shooters, aluminum is the second-best option due to its affordability and accuracy. If carbon arrows are not too stiff, they work well with longbows. 

Fiberglass is heavy arrows and travels slowly, so longbow shooters should stay away from using them.

Select Your Fletching: The two best materials for fletching are veins and feathers. More conventional, feathers can be shot with any kinds of bow. 

Note: To prevent harm to the fletching, you must use caution when handling it. Vanes are resilient and difficult to harm.

Choose Your Nocks: You can have nocks carved into the shaft or glued to the end. Field points are the best arrowheads for beginners.

Take into account draw weight, draw length, bow technology, and arrow materials. Experiment with different lengths and weights to find the best arrows for your longbow.

Please keep in mind that the length of an arrow should be 2-3 inches longer than the length of your draw.

Well, then, what grain broadhead for recurve?

For a recurve bow, choose a broadhead weighing between 100 and 125 grains. This ensures it matches your arrow and bow’s draw weight. 

The best weight depends on your shooting style and bow setup. If you want increased range and velocity, then go for a 100-grain broadhead. 

For large game hunting, choose a 125-grain broadhead. A heavier grain broadhead leads to more momentum and kinetic energy. Always follow the manufacturer’s advice for your specific bow.

However, a right arrow offers improved accuracy and better arrow flight. So, keep in mind the above factors to choose the right arrow.

Frequently Asked Questions(FAQs)

How Many Grain Broadhead Should I Shoot?

Most bowhunters use 100-grain broadheads because they provide the best balance for all common scenarios, including deer and most other common game. 125-grain broadheads, on the other hand, outperform 100-grain broadheads in almost every way. 

Can I Mix Broadhead Weights In My Quiver For Different Situations?

Yes, you can mix broadhead weights in your quiver to suit your needs. To ensure consistency in performance and accuracy, it’s best to use the same weight of broadheads for all arrows in a quiver.

Yes, there are safety concerns with broadhead weight and longbows. Broadheads kill by cutting blood vessels. A responsible bowhunter will use razor-sharp broadheads and only take shots that allow a clear, close shot to the game animal’s vital area.

Final Thoughts

A right-grain broadhead plays a crucial role in overall archery performance. It helps to ensure an ethical kill of the animal and provides better accuracy in target shooting. But the grain of a broadhead is typically influenced by the bow’s draw weight and the target practice game. So, what grain broadhead for longbow?

 In general, a standard broadhead weight ranges from 100 to 150 grains. If your draw weight is under 55 lbs, then 100 grain is suitable for you. If your draw weight is over 55 lbs,125 grain will be best for you, which will be effective in large game hunting for its better penetration ability.

Bob Magic

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Bob Magic

Meet Bob Magic, the archery maestro. A National Champion, “Coach of the Year,” and gold medalist. Bob simplifies archery, ensuring your bullseye success. Whether you’re a newbie or a pro, let Bob’s magic guide your arrow.

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